Monthly Archives: November 2013


Offices You are Almost Certain to Find in Any Seaport

All seaports tend to have certain common features. There are, for instance, certain offices that you are almost certain to find in almost any seaport.

The first type of offices you are almost certain to find in any seaport is that of customs offices. These are government offices, and they tend to be very busy, because all stuff coming in and all stuff going out through the port has to be cleared in these offices.

The second type of offices you are almost certain to find in any seaport is that of clearing and forwarding offices. These may be in the actual seaport compounds or just adjacent, and they are typically operated by independent service providers.

The third type of offices you are almost certain to find in any seaport is that of shipping company offices. These are the offices through which the shipping companies receive reports from their captains, and from where the various aspects of the shipping business are managed.

The fourth type of offices you are almost certain to find in any seaport is that of security offices. From a security point of view, seaports are regarded as sensitive installations. There are therefore typically many security officers milling around. Those officers tend to have offices from where they operate.

How Governments Get the Money to Run Sea Ports

Many sea ports in the world are owned by, and operated by, governments. A question arises, as to how the governments in question get the money to run such ports.

One way in which governments get the money to run sea ports is by charging fees to the owners of the ships that dock in the said ports.

Another way in which governments get the money to run seaports is by charging fees to the owners of the cargo that is brought in through the said ports.

Yet another way in which governments get the money to run seaports is by using tax funds. This is not an ideal scenario, but it is one that still plays out in many parts of the world, mainly due to port inefficiencies. The scenario is akin to one where, say, the New Jersey state government can end up having to pay Njuifile claims lodged at www.njuifile.net by folks after getting to sign in to njuifile.net using dollars from other tax spending votes. In other words, the whole thing is not ideal, but it has to be done when there is no alternative: otherwise the seaports may have to be closed down, with huge (negative) impact on the social, economic and political fronts.

Things That Can Introduce Inefficiencies to a Seaport

Certain things can introduce inefficiencies to a seaport.

The first thing that can introduce inefficiencies to a seaport is failure to invest in the physical infrastructure. If the physical infrastructure can’t meet the demands of the port, we end up with a situation where inefficiencies have to creep in. That is where, for instance, you end up with ships docking, but lacking any space to offload their cargo to. That is also where you end up with ships having to queue to wait to be offloaded, on account of there not being enough cranes.

The second thing that can introduce inefficiencies to a seaport is the tendency to hire incompetent folks to perform the various jobs there. In the area of IT, the folks hired to offer desktop support may be so incompetent that other staff members facing IT problems end up having to go to portals like www.logmein123.com, in order for them to access remote rescue.

The third thing that can introduce inefficiencies to a seaport is the failure to develop effective working systems. Without proper systems, the port staff end up performing tasks as they deem fit: which may not always be the best approach. It is always good to have standardized ways of doing things: hence the need for operational systems.

Analyzing the Two Modes of Training Used to Prepare the Employees Who Work in Seaports

Two modes of training are used in preparing the employees who work in seaports for their various roles there.

The first mode of training used to prepare the employees who work in seaports for their various roles is that which we can refer to as the formal training mode. This is where some of the employees (especially those who occupy the senior roles) undertake courses in things like maritime studies, to prepare them for work in the seaports.

The second mode of training used to prepare the employees who work in seaports for their various roles is that which we can refer to as the informal training mode. This is where, for the most part, the employees are trained ‘on the job,’ by mostly serving as apprentices to other more experienced employees. Some of the clerks, for instance, are beneficiaries of this sort of training.

In most cases, the employees who have been trained formally end up earning more than those who undergo informal training. Indeed, though both cadres of employees may be receiving paychecks based on data collected at ipay.adp.com, where you can check your income online, chances are that those who have undergone formal training may be earning several times as much money as those who have undergone informal training.

Three Types of Employers We Tend to Find Within a Seaport

A seaport tends to be a busy environment, with very many employees hustling around. A closer examination of the employees reveals that they don’t belong to a single employer. Rather, in most cases, we tend to have three types of employers within a seaport.

Firstly, within any given seaport, we tend to have some employees who are employed by the seaport authority. These are the folks who drive the cranes and the forklifts, as well as the clerks and all others.

Secondly, within any given seaport, we tend to have some employees who are employed by the government. Here, we are looking at, say, the policemen and the revenue authority staff who are normally to be found in the seaports. Seaport are viewed as ‘sensitive installations’ and the government tends to be very well represented there.

Thirdly, within any given seaport, we tend to have some employees who are employed by third party companies with operations at the seaports. The third party companies in question here tend to be private entities, operating along the same lines as, say, Macys whose employee connection website is remarkable. Here, we are specifically looking at the retailers with branches at the seaports, banks with operations there, container freight stations with operations there… and so on.